New Releases for May 19!

by Bryan Theiss

This week we have a few major family movies, a Jane Austen adaptation, a horror sequel, a cult movie long overdue on blu-ray, an animated super hero epic, and much more. Now available by mail or at our pickup window.

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We’re Open for Pickup!

Click here to see all the ways you can support Scarecrow during this period (including renting by mail).

 

After closing our doors in March to assist with social distancing efforts, Scarecrow Video will resume renting titles via our pickup window on Tuesday, May 19. We are asking patrons to phone in their orders, pay with a card (no cash at this time), and pick up their orders at Scarecrow.

Patrons should always check scarecrow.com for the latest information, but for now our plan is:

  • Pickup hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 12pm – 6pm (closed Sunday and Monday)
  • Please call us at (206) 524-8554 to request and pay for your rentals before arriving. Your order will be available at our pickup window (located between our main doors and our parking lot)
  • During this period of limited service, we are unable to offer our 2-for-1 Wednesday promotion.
  • When picking up your order, please be mindful of social distancing regulations (wear a face covering, maintain a distance of at least 6 feet between those waiting for service, etc.
  • If you have rentals to return, You may always use the drop slots in the main doors which are open 24/7, and we are also still gladly accepting returns by mail.
  • Consider purchasing pre-paid rental credits. They save time and money!
  • Remember that we have pre-paid mailers available to make returning titles easier. These are only $4.75, hold four discs, and the postage never expires. If you wish to purchase one, please let us know when you place your pickup order.

For those who prefer it, we are still offering our Rental by Mail service (which is now serving 13 states!). Click Here for info on signing up for that program.

 

 

“Familiar but Not”: Amirpour, Surya, and DaCosta Repurpose the Western

by Sage Cruser

Establishing itself as a prolific and popular genre for roughly the first half of the 20th century, then becoming less prolific yet still on-and-off popular with audiences through to today, the Western – with all the good and bad of it, in all its iterations – is responsible for a significant chunk of American film production. Associated with the genre are recognizable themes and tropes: individualism, retribution, the outlaw gunslinger, the beckoning horizon, and so on. Revolving around tales occurring in 19th century western regions of what is now the U.S., much of the genre’s content is ripe for criticism: racism and “white heroism,” imperialism, and misogyny, for example.

With so much existing material, most of which has been created by and about men, even the briefest of examinations reveals many of the Western’s myths and components that have contributed to shaping American popular culture.

Having thought about all this a fair amount, I regularly find myself seeking out innovative takes on the Western – especially those created by and about women. I’m interested in how contemporary women filmmakers harvest elements from such a deeply rooted genre and repurpose them to tell their own unique, modern stories. That kind of creativity can make for quality movies, and today I’m recommending three of them to you.  

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The Seasoned Ticket #87

Robert Horton is a Scarecrow board member and a longtime film critic. He will be contributing a series of “critic’s notes” to the Scarecrow blog—a chance to highlight worthy films playing locally and connecting them to the riches of Scarecrow’s collection.

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The Seasoned Ticket #86

Robert Horton is a Scarecrow board member and a longtime film critic. He will be contributing a series of “critic’s notes” to the Scarecrow blog—a chance to highlight worthy films playing locally and connecting them to the riches of Scarecrow’s collection.

Read More